Discover How To Cleanse Yourself With Birch Tea

The Birch trees or shrubs are know to be good for décor funiture and flooring. But did you know that the leaves of the Birch tree also provides healthy benefits? Read on to know more about the history and benefits of the Birch Tea.    

History

In Sanskrit, “Bhurga” referred to the white bark of a soft tree that is used for inscription and is said to be the origin of the Birch Tree. For the Celtics in Ancient Europe, the birch tree is call “Beth,” having “B” as a significant letter of the first month of the Celtic year. It is said that Wlaes is truly where the vast growth of the birch tree was seen and was referred to as “Bedwen.” Birch tree belongs to the Betulaceae species of deciduous plant life, typically growing at temperate countries above the equator.

Today, three varieties of birch grow in Britain – Dwarf, Downy and Silver Birch. The Dwarf Birch shrub can be seen mostly in the moorlands of Scotland. The Downy Birch is a small tree and closer to likeness with that of the Silver Birch or the American White Birch. It is characteristic of smooth, velvety (thus, downy) shoots that cultivate in cold, wet acidic soils of mountainous regions. The Silver Birch grows on dry soils and characterized by hairless and warty shoots.

In the US, there are six types of Betulaceae and one of them is the Betula genus, of which the different kinds of Birch trees fall under. Other species include the Alder Tree (genus Alnus), Hazel (Corylus), Hornbeam (Carpinus), Hop hornbeam (Ostrya) and the Magnolia Tree (Ostryopsis).

Uses

The bark of the birch tree is commonly used for furniture and hard wood flooring. Those with dark grained and closely packed hardwood of the yellow Birch are preferred for durable kitchen flooring and high-end décor furniture. Darker woods and stained birch provides the look of mahogany preferred for lower-priced furniture. White birches, because of it’s light color are preferred as ornamental trees, and usually come from the Canada and northern US. The bark of the White birch separates in layers and was used to make baskets and design canoes. In Europe, because of the vast growth, the bark and twigs are made into bobbins for thread mills, broom handles, broom hairs and herring-barrel staves. Lighter twigs are used for heavy embroidery like thatching. The tree bark, when burned, can be used for gunpowder or debilitating gases.

The birch sap produces a sugary juice that can be taken as is or fermented to produce wine, vinegar and beer. Birch Wine comes from a fermentation of the sap collected in early spring, and infused with honey, cloves and citrus peel. It makes for a very pleasant cordial brew. A large tree yields 40 to 60 liters of sap.

Birch Tea

The fresh Birch leaves have been used for urinary infections, cystitis and joint problems like gout, arthritis, rheumatism and water retention. The fresh leaves maybe boiled and applied directly onto the skin for a topical application. Dried leaves can be infused and made into a tea. Drinking birch tea is said to help clean the body’s waste system. Prolonged use can dissolve kidney stones and other urinary infections.

To make the tea, collect young shoots of birch leaves during springtime and dry them out under the sun. Put half a cup of the dried leaves on the tea pot and pour a small amount of boiling water to wash the leaves and temper the pot. Swirl the water around the pot making sure that all parts of the pot are tempered as well as most of the leaves has been dampened in the process. Dispose of the wash. You may now fill the pot with boiling water and let stand for 10 minutes to brew. Enjoy the fresh brew of mint and refreshing flavor, 3-4 times daily. Occasionally it can also be used as a mouthwash.

Sip a fresh brew today and experience the healthy benefits of birch tea.



For A Limited Time Download The “Healthy Stress Management Tips & Techniques” Report, It’s Great You”re Gonna Love It!

Discover How To Cleanse Yourself With Birch Tea

The Birch trees or shrubs are know to be good for décor funiture and flooring. But did you know that the leaves of the Birch tree also provides healthy benefits? Read on to know more about the history and benefits of the Birch Tea.    

History

In Sanskrit, “Bhurga” referred to the white bark of a soft tree that is used for inscription and is said to be the origin of the Birch Tree. For the Celtics in Ancient Europe, the birch tree is call “Beth,” having “B” as a significant letter of the first month of the Celtic year. It is said that Wlaes is truly where the vast growth of the birch tree was seen and was referred to as “Bedwen.” Birch tree belongs to the Betulaceae species of deciduous plant life, typically growing at temperate countries above the equator.

Today, three varieties of birch grow in Britain – Dwarf, Downy and Silver Birch. The Dwarf Birch shrub can be seen mostly in the moorlands of Scotland. The Downy Birch is a small tree and closer to likeness with that of the Silver Birch or the American White Birch. It is characteristic of smooth, velvety (thus, downy) shoots that cultivate in cold, wet acidic soils of mountainous regions. The Silver Birch grows on dry soils and characterized by hairless and warty shoots.

In the US, there are six types of Betulaceae and one of them is the Betula genus, of which the different kinds of Birch trees fall under. Other species include the Alder Tree (genus Alnus), Hazel (Corylus), Hornbeam (Carpinus), Hop hornbeam (Ostrya) and the Magnolia Tree (Ostryopsis).

Uses

The bark of the birch tree is commonly used for furniture and hard wood flooring. Those with dark grained and closely packed hardwood of the yellow Birch are preferred for durable kitchen flooring and high-end décor furniture. Darker woods and stained birch provides the look of mahogany preferred for lower-priced furniture. White birches, because of it’s light color are preferred as ornamental trees, and usually come from the Canada and northern US. The bark of the White birch separates in layers and was used to make baskets and design canoes. In Europe, because of the vast growth, the bark and twigs are made into bobbins for thread mills, broom handles, broom hairs and herring-barrel staves. Lighter twigs are used for heavy embroidery like thatching. The tree bark, when burned, can be used for gunpowder or debilitating gases.

The birch sap produces a sugary juice that can be taken as is or fermented to produce wine, vinegar and beer. Birch Wine comes from a fermentation of the sap collected in early spring, and infused with honey, cloves and citrus peel. It makes for a very pleasant cordial brew. A large tree yields 40 to 60 liters of sap.

Birch Tea

The fresh Birch leaves have been used for urinary infections, cystitis and joint problems like gout, arthritis, rheumatism and water retention. The fresh leaves maybe boiled and applied directly onto the skin for a topical application. Dried leaves can be infused and made into a tea. Drinking birch tea is said to help clean the body’s waste system. Prolonged use can dissolve kidney stones and other urinary infections.

To make the tea, collect young shoots of birch leaves during springtime and dry them out under the sun. Put half a cup of the dried leaves on the tea pot and pour a small amount of boiling water to wash the leaves and temper the pot. Swirl the water around the pot making sure that all parts of the pot are tempered as well as most of the leaves has been dampened in the process. Dispose of the wash. You may now fill the pot with boiling water and let stand for 10 minutes to brew. Enjoy the fresh brew of mint and refreshing flavor, 3-4 times daily. Occasionally it can also be used as a mouthwash.

Sip a fresh brew today and experience the healthy benefits of birch tea.





For A Limited Time Download The “Healthy Stress Management Tips & Techniques” Report, It’s Great You”re Gonna Love It!

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