Food Safety

Another form of health safety that is important in our health is food safety.  Maintaining good food storage and preparation procedures to prevent food poisoning is a great place to start.  Cleaning of preparation areas and equipment for example using designated cutting boards for raw meats and vegetables.  Thorough cooking of all meats is a definate way to eliminate viruses, or bacteria also known as e coli, salmonella etc.  Washing hands after touching uncooked food when preparing meals is also a big part of food safety and hygiene.  

When preparing food to be cooked, it is very important to not use the same utencils to prepare different foods.  This is a sure way to carry over many forms of bacteria.  Do not share cutlery when eating as this too is a good way to carry forms of germs and bacteria.  Wash hands prior to cooking, after touching raw meats, and eliminate licking fingers or hands while or after eating.

Proper storage of food so as to prevent contamination by vermin is also important.  Never leave food out for extended periods of time after cooking, as this can breed bacteria.  Refrigeration of foods (and avoidance of specific foods in environments where refrigeration is or was not feasible).  Labeling food to indicate when it was produced or cooked, and indicate its “best before date”.

During the holidays we tend to prepare larger, more complex meals than what we are accustomed to cooking.  This will increase potential for food borne illness.  Cross contamination is a big key role in food borne illness.  Wash your hands with warm water and soap before and after handling foods. Use the 2 hour rule.   Refrigerate or freeze perishables, prepared food and leftovers within 2 hours. Do not leave them sitting out at room temperature.

The Thaw Law

Thaw foods in the refrigerator, not at room temperature on the counter top.  Once the food reaches a certain degree, this is breeding grounds for bacteria. Foods should also be cooked to a proper internal temperature, and be checked for doneness using a thermometer.  There are visual signs as well of “done” food.   Use visual signs of doneness when a thermometer is not used:

    Clear juices run from meat and poultry, not pink.
    Pork, veal and poultry are white inside, not pink or red.
    Shellfish is opaque and fish flakes easily with a fork.
    Egg yolks are firm, not runny, and egg whites are opaque.
    Steam rises from food.

Always marinate foods in the refrigerator instead of the counter top.  The refrigerator will keep the food from going into the “red zone” or the danger zone where bacteria multiply rapidly.  Always store raw meats, poultry and seafood wrapped tightly on the bottom shelf of the refrigerator, as to prevent raw juices from dripping onto other foods.



For A Limited Time Download The “Healthy Stress Management Tips & Techniques” Report, It’s Great You”re Gonna Love It!

Food Safety

Another form of health safety that is important in our health is food safety.  Maintaining good food storage and preparation procedures to prevent food poisoning is a great place to start.  Cleaning of preparation areas and equipment for example using designated cutting boards for raw meats and vegetables.  Thorough cooking of all meats is a definate way to eliminate viruses, or bacteria also known as e coli, salmonella etc.  Washing hands after touching uncooked food when preparing meals is also a big part of food safety and hygiene.  

When preparing food to be cooked, it is very important to not use the same utencils to prepare different foods.  This is a sure way to carry over many forms of bacteria.  Do not share cutlery when eating as this too is a good way to carry forms of germs and bacteria.  Wash hands prior to cooking, after touching raw meats, and eliminate licking fingers or hands while or after eating.

Proper storage of food so as to prevent contamination by vermin is also important.  Never leave food out for extended periods of time after cooking, as this can breed bacteria.  Refrigeration of foods (and avoidance of specific foods in environments where refrigeration is or was not feasible).  Labeling food to indicate when it was produced or cooked, and indicate its “best before date”.

During the holidays we tend to prepare larger, more complex meals than what we are accustomed to cooking.  This will increase potential for food borne illness.  Cross contamination is a big key role in food borne illness.  Wash your hands with warm water and soap before and after handling foods. Use the 2 hour rule.   Refrigerate or freeze perishables, prepared food and leftovers within 2 hours. Do not leave them sitting out at room temperature.

The Thaw Law

Thaw foods in the refrigerator, not at room temperature on the counter top.  Once the food reaches a certain degree, this is breeding grounds for bacteria. Foods should also be cooked to a proper internal temperature, and be checked for doneness using a thermometer.  There are visual signs as well of “done” food.   Use visual signs of doneness when a thermometer is not used:

    Clear juices run from meat and poultry, not pink.
    Pork, veal and poultry are white inside, not pink or red.
    Shellfish is opaque and fish flakes easily with a fork.
    Egg yolks are firm, not runny, and egg whites are opaque.
    Steam rises from food.

Always marinate foods in the refrigerator instead of the counter top.  The refrigerator will keep the food from going into the “red zone” or the danger zone where bacteria multiply rapidly.  Always store raw meats, poultry and seafood wrapped tightly on the bottom shelf of the refrigerator, as to prevent raw juices from dripping onto other foods.





For A Limited Time Download The “Healthy Stress Management Tips & Techniques” Report, It’s Great You”re Gonna Love It!

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