Summer Tea: Blackberry/ Raspberry Leaf Tea

During the warm and fall months, try a new flavor in your tea. Use the blackberry/ raspberry tealeaf to bring wild fruitiness to your drink. Read this article to know more about it.   

The Blackberry

A blackberry is a general term used to describe species of rough, thorny fruits. In botany, it is technically not a berry but a group of fruits of drupelets. It grows extensively in Continental Europe, with shrubs reaching 10ft. The blackberry fruit is soft bodied and is a popular flavor of jams. It is also used to make flavored drinks and wine. Among its many varieties is a common growth pattern: dense arching stems growing in a jumble and carrying short curved offshoot spikes. Those branches that reach the ground roots from the node tip, and thus propagate. Very insidious, it grows rapidly, spreading and colonizing large areas in a short period of time. It thrives in poor soil and is an early settler of wasteland and building sites. White flowers appear midyear (May – August) radially lobed in 3 – 5 in a bunch, eventually ripening to a black or dark purple fruit, thus the term “blackberries.”

In the United Kingdom, elders believe that blackberries picked after mid-September are marked by the devil, as shown in the white waxy coating on smaller species of the blackberries. This, of course, is just part of the growth process of the shrubs in preparation for the cold months. A true and useful advice would be to avoid eating blackberries growing along roads and highways. Lead from the nearby traffic will be toxic.

The Raspberry

The Raspberry plant is a shrub that produces a red berries from May to August. It is identical to the blackberry except for its color. It breeds in forest clearings especially where an open space is available after a fire or woodcutting. Like the blackberry, it is a colonizer of open space for colonization by this opportunistic colonizer of distressed soil. The plant needs to be cut back, in order to cultivate orderly. There are two commercially available types: the everbearing plant, which bears fruit on premier-year stems during summer and fall, and the June bearing species producing fruit within a relatively short period in midsummer. Another species called Golden raspberry, characterized by pale yellow fruit, has been selected for ornamental uses. Raspberries grows at a hardiness zone 4.

Blackberry/ Raspberry Leaf Tea

When used as tea, one will experience the tangy and fruity flavor of blackberry/ raspberry leaves. Some will prefer adding honey, and that’s to avoid the tartness of this concoction. High in Vitamin C, trace minerals, and iron, the tea can be taken with ice, hot, or creatively frozen into Popsicle sticks. In addition, it has high calcium content and can aid in abundant milk creation.

To enjoy this popular herbal tea, use young leaves of the blackberry/ raspberry plant or those that have completely dried. Make sure it is not old dried midway, as the leaves become toxic when partially dried or have wilted. It is not fatal but causes dizziness and vomiting. A handful is needed for every pot of fresh blackberry/ raspberry leaf tea you prepare, while half a cup is needed for the dried leaves. Steep in boiling water for about 10 minutes. Try not to mash the dried blackberry/ raspberry leaves as it can bring out more tartness. A finer flavor is produced when the leaves are intact.

Some caution against the consumption of blackberry/ raspberry tea during pregnancy as it is believed to cause contractions. Consult with your obstetrician for guidance on herbal tea consumption during pregnancy.

Take in summer and try a refreshing brew of blackberry/ raspberry leaf tea.



For A Limited Time Download The “Healthy Stress Management Tips & Techniques” Report, It’s Great You”re Gonna Love It!

Summer Tea: Blackberry/ Raspberry Leaf Tea

During the warm and fall months, try a new flavor in your tea. Use the blackberry/ raspberry tealeaf to bring wild fruitiness to your drink. Read this article to know more about it.   

The Blackberry

A blackberry is a general term used to describe species of rough, thorny fruits. In botany, it is technically not a berry but a group of fruits of drupelets. It grows extensively in Continental Europe, with shrubs reaching 10ft. The blackberry fruit is soft bodied and is a popular flavor of jams. It is also used to make flavored drinks and wine. Among its many varieties is a common growth pattern: dense arching stems growing in a jumble and carrying short curved offshoot spikes. Those branches that reach the ground roots from the node tip, and thus propagate. Very insidious, it grows rapidly, spreading and colonizing large areas in a short period of time. It thrives in poor soil and is an early settler of wasteland and building sites. White flowers appear midyear (May – August) radially lobed in 3 – 5 in a bunch, eventually ripening to a black or dark purple fruit, thus the term “blackberries.”

In the United Kingdom, elders believe that blackberries picked after mid-September are marked by the devil, as shown in the white waxy coating on smaller species of the blackberries. This, of course, is just part of the growth process of the shrubs in preparation for the cold months. A true and useful advice would be to avoid eating blackberries growing along roads and highways. Lead from the nearby traffic will be toxic.

The Raspberry

The Raspberry plant is a shrub that produces a red berries from May to August. It is identical to the blackberry except for its color. It breeds in forest clearings especially where an open space is available after a fire or woodcutting. Like the blackberry, it is a colonizer of open space for colonization by this opportunistic colonizer of distressed soil. The plant needs to be cut back, in order to cultivate orderly. There are two commercially available types: the everbearing plant, which bears fruit on premier-year stems during summer and fall, and the June bearing species producing fruit within a relatively short period in midsummer. Another species called Golden raspberry, characterized by pale yellow fruit, has been selected for ornamental uses. Raspberries grows at a hardiness zone 4.

Blackberry/ Raspberry Leaf Tea

When used as tea, one will experience the tangy and fruity flavor of blackberry/ raspberry leaves. Some will prefer adding honey, and that’s to avoid the tartness of this concoction. High in Vitamin C, trace minerals, and iron, the tea can be taken with ice, hot, or creatively frozen into Popsicle sticks. In addition, it has high calcium content and can aid in abundant milk creation.

To enjoy this popular herbal tea, use young leaves of the blackberry/ raspberry plant or those that have completely dried. Make sure it is not old dried midway, as the leaves become toxic when partially dried or have wilted. It is not fatal but causes dizziness and vomiting. A handful is needed for every pot of fresh blackberry/ raspberry leaf tea you prepare, while half a cup is needed for the dried leaves. Steep in boiling water for about 10 minutes. Try not to mash the dried blackberry/ raspberry leaves as it can bring out more tartness. A finer flavor is produced when the leaves are intact.

Some caution against the consumption of blackberry/ raspberry tea during pregnancy as it is believed to cause contractions. Consult with your obstetrician for guidance on herbal tea consumption during pregnancy.

Take in summer and try a refreshing brew of blackberry/ raspberry leaf tea.





For A Limited Time Download The “Healthy Stress Management Tips & Techniques” Report, It’s Great You”re Gonna Love It!

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