The Soothing and Calming Cup of Strawberry Leaf Tea

The Strawberry fruit is a staple fruit on the American table.  From breakfast to midnight snack, from cocktails to desserts, the fruit is an intricate part of one’s palatable choice.  But did you know that apart from the fruit, the leaf of the strawberry is also edible?  Drinkable is the more accurate description and healthy, too! Read more about the strawberry leaf tea.  History of the Strawberry Plant Belonging to the genus Fragaria of the Rose species, the strawberry plant is a low leafy perennial with edible red heart-shaped fruits, growing in temperate and mountainous tropical lands.    

Historically, it has grown sporadically since pre-Christian era but was given agricultural focus only in the 1400s. The species that grew from Chile is believed to be the commonly grown strawberry in Europe and the western United States.  They are the ones usually found in the fruit section of your grocery that are red, big and plump.  However, it is not as delicious as the wild strawberries that grow in the dry, open woodlands of Northeastern America. 

Small, juicy, luscious berries characterize the wild strawberry, with a much richer flavor than the common large berry. Natives throughout North America ate the savory fruit and evidences also show they have infused tea with the young leaves of the strawberry plant.

Benefits of Strawberry Leaf Tea 

Indigenous ancestors of America discovered early on that strawberry tea is good for one’s health.  The leaf provides a high concentration of Vitamin C.  Because of that, it is a perfect drink for pregnant women and nursing mothers.  They provide much needed vitamins for the growth.

The strawberry leaf also produces tannins when heated in tea.  Tannins are anti-oxidants that help combat sicknesses and infections, particularly in the digestive system.  Historically, it has been used for upset stomach and to treat mild diarrhea.  A textbook of herbal medicine in the US recommended strawberry leaf extraction mixed with blackberry syrup treat dysentery, chlamydia or gonorrhea, and urinary problems. Stains or spots are common in dried Strawberry leaves, and should not be confused with an insidious form of mold. Making the Strawberry Leaf TeaSpring and summer are the ideal seasons for harvesting leaves. 

Harvest young, fresh springs to get the finest flavor. Either fresh leaves or completely dried leaves can be used in the infusion.  Strawberry leaf tea made from old leaves or half-dried leaves can be toxic and bitter in flavor. Take special care, though, during the strawberry leaf picking because the plant also needs to preserve its ability to grow and spread as well as to stabilize the soil around the plantation. 

Lightly walk, pick and do it consistently throughout the cultivated area.Use the fresh or dried leaves to make the tea.  You may also mix young shoots and flowers for a stronger flavor.  You can also find commercially available strawberry leaf tea bags and strawberry leaf mixes with raspberry and honey.  Put half a cup of the herbs on the teapot and swirl the water around the pot. 

Make sure that all parts of the pot are tempered and most of the leaves have been dampened in the process.  Dispose of the wash.  Fill the pot with boiling water and brew for 10 to 15 minutes. Pour the rose-colored infusion and smell the fresh strawberry aroma as you do.   Enjoy a fresh brew of soothing and calming strawberry leaf tea, today.   



For A Limited Time Download The “Healthy Stress Management Tips & Techniques” Report, It’s Great You”re Gonna Love It!

The Soothing and Calming Cup of Strawberry Leaf Tea

The Strawberry fruit is a staple fruit on the American table.  From breakfast to midnight snack, from cocktails to desserts, the fruit is an intricate part of one’s palatable choice.  But did you know that apart from the fruit, the leaf of the strawberry is also edible?  Drinkable is the more accurate description and healthy, too! Read more about the strawberry leaf tea.  History of the Strawberry Plant Belonging to the genus Fragaria of the Rose species, the strawberry plant is a low leafy perennial with edible red heart-shaped fruits, growing in temperate and mountainous tropical lands.    

Historically, it has grown sporadically since pre-Christian era but was given agricultural focus only in the 1400s. The species that grew from Chile is believed to be the commonly grown strawberry in Europe and the western United States.  They are the ones usually found in the fruit section of your grocery that are red, big and plump.  However, it is not as delicious as the wild strawberries that grow in the dry, open woodlands of Northeastern America. 

Small, juicy, luscious berries characterize the wild strawberry, with a much richer flavor than the common large berry. Natives throughout North America ate the savory fruit and evidences also show they have infused tea with the young leaves of the strawberry plant.

Benefits of Strawberry Leaf Tea 

Indigenous ancestors of America discovered early on that strawberry tea is good for one’s health.  The leaf provides a high concentration of Vitamin C.  Because of that, it is a perfect drink for pregnant women and nursing mothers.  They provide much needed vitamins for the growth.

The strawberry leaf also produces tannins when heated in tea.  Tannins are anti-oxidants that help combat sicknesses and infections, particularly in the digestive system.  Historically, it has been used for upset stomach and to treat mild diarrhea.  A textbook of herbal medicine in the US recommended strawberry leaf extraction mixed with blackberry syrup treat dysentery, chlamydia or gonorrhea, and urinary problems. Stains or spots are common in dried Strawberry leaves, and should not be confused with an insidious form of mold. Making the Strawberry Leaf TeaSpring and summer are the ideal seasons for harvesting leaves. 

Harvest young, fresh springs to get the finest flavor. Either fresh leaves or completely dried leaves can be used in the infusion.  Strawberry leaf tea made from old leaves or half-dried leaves can be toxic and bitter in flavor. Take special care, though, during the strawberry leaf picking because the plant also needs to preserve its ability to grow and spread as well as to stabilize the soil around the plantation. 

Lightly walk, pick and do it consistently throughout the cultivated area.Use the fresh or dried leaves to make the tea.  You may also mix young shoots and flowers for a stronger flavor.  You can also find commercially available strawberry leaf tea bags and strawberry leaf mixes with raspberry and honey.  Put half a cup of the herbs on the teapot and swirl the water around the pot. 

Make sure that all parts of the pot are tempered and most of the leaves have been dampened in the process.  Dispose of the wash.  Fill the pot with boiling water and brew for 10 to 15 minutes. Pour the rose-colored infusion and smell the fresh strawberry aroma as you do.   Enjoy a fresh brew of soothing and calming strawberry leaf tea, today.   





For A Limited Time Download The “Healthy Stress Management Tips & Techniques” Report, It’s Great You”re Gonna Love It!

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