What Is Your Dominant Gene

Your hair. Your eyes. Your facial characteristics. Your susceptibly to disorder. They are all derived from your parents in the form of genes. In the last few decades, there has been an explosion of research dealing with genes, heredity, and genetics. Research has shown that genes play an important role in both how we look and how we act. If you would like to learn more about genes and dominant genes, continue reading this article. Throughout the article, we will discuss what a gene is, how genes work, and what having a dominant gene means.

Before we can learn what a dominant gene is, we first need to learn what a gene is. To do this, we need to go all the way back to biology basics. As most people know, humans are made up of DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid). DNA is comprised of 46 chromosomes. Within our bodies, each of these chromosomes are paired together (to form 23 pairs of chromosomes). Where do these chromosomes come from? They come from our parents!      

The father’s sperm consists of 23 chromosomes and the mothers’ egg consists of 23 chromosomes. You, therefore, receive half of your chromosomes from your mother and the other half from your father. The 23rd chromosome is the sex chromosome (males get an X chromosome from their mother and a Y chromosome from their father, whereas females get 2 X chromosomes). The other 22 chromosome pairs (also called alleles) determine other characteristics such as hair and eye color.

So, now that we know what genes are, what are dominant genes? The genes that we inherit from our parents can be either dominant or recessive. If we inherit two recessive genes, we inherit a recessive trait. Similarly, if we inherit two dominant genes, we inherit a dominant trait. Dominant genes, however, always ‘beat’ recessive genes. Therefore, if we were to inherit a dominant gene from one parent and a recessive gene from the other, we will end up with a dominant trait.

Let’s use hair color as a more concrete example. Dominant genes are associated with brown hair. Recessive genes are associated with blonde hair. In order for a child to have blonde hair, they must inherit 2 recessive genes (one from each parent). A child could be born with brown hair, however, if they inherited 2 dominant genes, or if they inherited one dominant and one recessive gene (because the dominant gene trumps the recessive gene).

What other traits, other than brown hair, are associated with dominant genes? Dominant genes are also associated with curly hair, dimples, farsightedness, thick lips, and being double jointed.

To learn more about dominant and recessive character traits, conduct an online search, or head to your local library. There is a vast amount of information surrounding the concept of genes. What is covered within this article is only beginning. Learn more about dominant and recessive traits today to determine what traits you have inherited from your parents!



For A Limited Time Download The “Healthy Stress Management Tips & Techniques” Report, It’s Great You”re Gonna Love It!

What Is Your Dominant Gene

Your hair. Your eyes. Your facial characteristics. Your susceptibly to disorder. They are all derived from your parents in the form of genes. In the last few decades, there has been an explosion of research dealing with genes, heredity, and genetics. Research has shown that genes play an important role in both how we look and how we act. If you would like to learn more about genes and dominant genes, continue reading this article. Throughout the article, we will discuss what a gene is, how genes work, and what having a dominant gene means.

Before we can learn what a dominant gene is, we first need to learn what a gene is. To do this, we need to go all the way back to biology basics. As most people know, humans are made up of DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid). DNA is comprised of 46 chromosomes. Within our bodies, each of these chromosomes are paired together (to form 23 pairs of chromosomes). Where do these chromosomes come from? They come from our parents!      

The father’s sperm consists of 23 chromosomes and the mothers’ egg consists of 23 chromosomes. You, therefore, receive half of your chromosomes from your mother and the other half from your father. The 23rd chromosome is the sex chromosome (males get an X chromosome from their mother and a Y chromosome from their father, whereas females get 2 X chromosomes). The other 22 chromosome pairs (also called alleles) determine other characteristics such as hair and eye color.

So, now that we know what genes are, what are dominant genes? The genes that we inherit from our parents can be either dominant or recessive. If we inherit two recessive genes, we inherit a recessive trait. Similarly, if we inherit two dominant genes, we inherit a dominant trait. Dominant genes, however, always ‘beat’ recessive genes. Therefore, if we were to inherit a dominant gene from one parent and a recessive gene from the other, we will end up with a dominant trait.

Let’s use hair color as a more concrete example. Dominant genes are associated with brown hair. Recessive genes are associated with blonde hair. In order for a child to have blonde hair, they must inherit 2 recessive genes (one from each parent). A child could be born with brown hair, however, if they inherited 2 dominant genes, or if they inherited one dominant and one recessive gene (because the dominant gene trumps the recessive gene).

What other traits, other than brown hair, are associated with dominant genes? Dominant genes are also associated with curly hair, dimples, farsightedness, thick lips, and being double jointed.

To learn more about dominant and recessive character traits, conduct an online search, or head to your local library. There is a vast amount of information surrounding the concept of genes. What is covered within this article is only beginning. Learn more about dominant and recessive traits today to determine what traits you have inherited from your parents!





For A Limited Time Download The “Healthy Stress Management Tips & Techniques” Report, It’s Great You”re Gonna Love It!

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